Alameda Native History Project

Latest Articles

The Alameda Shellmound Maps
Created using derivatives of open-source data, including (but not limited to) USGS, NOAA, USCG, NASA, Google Earth. Analyzed, processed, and produced by the Alameda Native History Project, using open-source software available to anyone with a smart phone, and the most basic computer. Why did the Alameda Native History Project create these maps? Necessity The first […]
Bay Area Shellmound Map
Alameda Native History Project’s map of the Shellmounds of the San Francisco Bay Area is available now. This map is based on N.C. Nelson’s “Map of the San Francisco Bay Region Showing Distribution of Shellheaps”, which was published in 1909. This map, represents the first-hand observations of shellmounds during N.C. Nelson’s survey of the San […]
Lecturing in a Museum Which Doesn’t Represent You
An Open Letter to Reverend Michael Yoshii, and Serena Chen, two of the lecturers set to speak in the Alameda Museum’s “Virtual Speakers Series”, for AAPI Heritage Month Lecture Series tomorrow, Monday, May 23, 2022. Here’s the flyer: Background: I tried to call Lillian Galedo, but I wasn’t able to reach her for comment. I […]
Alameda Museum: 74 Years of White History?
The Alameda Museum was founded in 1948; seventy-four years ago. It is a public institution, which is dedicated to fostering public interest in the history of Alameda. The mission of the Alameda Museum is three-fold: To accumulate, catalog, conserve, and display appropriate documents, photographs, objects, and artifacts relating to the city and its residents;To foster […]
3 Ways Public Art Promotes Pan-Indian Confusion
While being billed and paid for as an “homage to the gentle savages which once roamed the coasts and hills of this area thousands of years ago”: Many of the images presented to you as “Native American Art”, and installed in places like Parks, Malls, Skate Parks, and other Public Spaces, and “Public Arenas”, are […]
Ohlone: The First Alamedans, “Were Not a ‘Branch of Miwok Indians’”
When “The Spanish” came to the San Francisco Bay Area, they called all of the people who lived here “Costanoans”; and promptly killed, and corralled them into the California Missions; then began to colonize the land by bringing cows, catfish, eucalyptus, and other foreign plants and animals. The primary language for the Mission San Jose […]

Decolonize

History

Mission

The mission of the Alameda Native History Project is to decolonize history by presenting historically accurate information about the First Alamedans, and the Shellmounds of Alameda, without the use of paywalls, advertising, or compromising editorial control of what is a Native American led and created project.

Methods

  1. Present accurate, unambiguous information about the Native History of Alameda.
  2. Combat the misinformation, and omissions, of the white-washed narrative presented by Alameda’s historians.
  3. Hold public institutions accountable for their role in the continued erasure and marginalization of the First Alamedans; specifically, the City of Alameda, and the Alameda Museum.

Goals

To elevate the discussion of Native American history and life in (what’s known as) the City of Alameda, beyond the basic Western Colonial Fairytale of white people finding a lush, abandoned paradise, ripe for the taking–and asking, “Where did they all go?” [In spite of the fact such events as the “Indian Wars”, and “Trail of Tears”, were happening at the same time.]


To illuminate the fact that there were over 425 shellmounds in the San Francisco Bay Area; and at least 4 of those mounds existed in Alameda, and Bay Farm.


To achieve recognition for the shellmounds by the installation of monuments, memorials, and public art, where members of the public, can come and learn about the First Alamedans, and the importance, and sanctimony, of shellmounds.


To embolden the City of Alameda to apologize for the destruction of the Alameda Shellmounds, and take actions to ensure the survival and prosperity of Ohlone People, the repatriation of their ancestors and artifacts, and recompense for damage by atrocities committed in the City of Alameda’s name; and to recognize the Muwekma Ohlone Tribe of the San Francisco Bay Area as the true and sovereign Tribal Nation, and First Peoples, of what is now known as the City of Alameda.


To uplift the voices, prayers and efforts of other impacted, and marginalized communities; to stand up in solidarity with them, to value their lives, freedom, and self-determination, above profit and self-interest.

Alameda Shellmounds Map

The first, and original, Alameda Shellmound Map, by Gabriel Duncan. This map aggregates the pre-existing work by N.C. Nelson (on the Shellmounds of the San Francisco Bay Region); and Alameda’s own Imelda Merlin (from “Alameda: A Geological History”); and expounds on them, by tying in historical newspaper articles, and City of Alameda records, to create the most detailed, and complete picture of the Alameda Shellmounds to date.

Map of the Shellmounds of the San Francisco Bay Area

The larger sequel to the Alameda Shellmounds Map. This map was hand-plotted using a specially reprojected version of the N.C. Nelson map showing the distribution of shellmounds in the San Francisco Bay Region. While not all points are completely plotted, this interactive map helps to illustrate the density and prevalence of shellmounds in the Bay Area; and illuminate the concept of “Native Land” in a way which is more immediate, and tangible to contemporary learners.


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info@alamedanativehistoryproject.com

ADDRESS:

2201 Shoreline Drive #6334

Alameda, California 94501

PHONE NUMBER:

(510) 747-8423